Species roses and hybrids


Click on thumbnail images to enlarge


Banksia

Species rose. Vigorous climber, completely thornless. Covered with bunches of tiny yellow or white flowers early in spring. We also have the hybrid form “Purezza” which repeats (white).  available now

bracteataBracteata

An American species, who likes it very much here, thank you very much. One of the very few repeating species, this baby produces big shining white single flowers pretty much all year round. The growth habit I would describe as a cross between a rugosa and a rambler! Wicked recurved thorns all over its shiny green arms. Plant it somewhere you never want to go, and admire from a distance!! Sold out this season

rosa-caninaCanina

The dog rose, and declared a noxious pest in the south island, but lovely never the less.Very simple single pink flowers in late spring.sold out

dupontiiDupontii

Natural Hybrid. Large arching shrub or can be grown as a short climber. Flowers are large,single white blushed pink on edges. The petals are unusually soft and delicate for a single rose. A very lovely sight in full flower. Available now.

de-le-grifferiede la Grifferie

Originally used as a root stock in NZ so can often be found in abandoned gardens where the grafted plant has died and been overtaken by the rootstock. This rose is certainly worth garden merit, it is believed to be a cross between multiflora and gallica and certainly takes the best traits from both…inherited the thornless nature of multiflora and the flower form and perfume from the gallica. Also it’s willingness to sucker! Makes a wonderful hedge. Available now

ecae-2Ecae

We grew this rose from seed many years ago and after many years of unsuccessfully taking cuttings, it has finally started to sucker, so should be available next year. It is a slow growing, moderate bush with small lemon yellow flowers dotted al along it’s stems from quit early in the season. The leaves are reminiscent of a pimpinellifolia but has very distinct straight brown thorns  Available soon.

Fortuniana ?

No guarantees here, but this rose is certainly a cross between Banksia and Laevigata. A medium climber with very double white flowers appearing at the same time as these 2 species. Laevigata type thorns, Banksia type leaves. Available now

Grass Roots Roses - LaevigataLaevigata

Vigorous Rambler. Flowers very early spring for several months. You need to find the right place for this baby tho…grows into a very thorny monster. Available now

Grass Roots Roses | Indica majorIndica Major

Another old rootstock that everyone should grow, Indica Major is a species china rose and while technically a once flowerer, the season starts very early in August or September and usually carries on till Christmas. Very sweet simple double blooms grace the large bush/short climber for much of the season. small plants available now

Multiflora

Rambler. Commonly used as root stock and becomes rather a nuisance in wild parts of the garden. Birds love their multitudinous hips and spread them around. We grow some of Multifloras children that have crossed with something a bit more colourful but retained her attractive thornless nature. Available on request

Nitida x Rugosa

A rose we grew from seed taken from a bush of Rosa Nitida. When it started to grow it became obvious it was not a purebred but had crossed with the very promiscuous rugose nearby. Very attractive leaves and flowers  Available on request

Rosa Mundi

This is a sport of the ancient Rosa Gallica, which is renowned from medieval times for it’s medicinal qualities. It is identical in every way to it’s parent plant except instead of plain pink it is splashed and marbled with white. Every flower is different and en masse on the bush it is quite captivating. As it is a species rose it is vigorous and healthy and like all the gallicas, suckers freely. available soon

Roxburghii (ancient)

Species rose. Commonly called the chestnut rose. It is a large shrub with unusual peeling grey bark and small bright green leaves. It is evergreen and really likes it in Auckland. We have the double variety which has large pink flowers emerging from an unusual spiny bud that looks a bit like a chestnut. Available now

roxburghii